About

 

Culture

Bangladesh has a history. The land, the rivers and the lives of the common people formed a rich heritage with marked differences from neighbouring regions. It has evolved over the centuries and encompasses the cultural diversity of several social groups of Bangladesh.

The culture of Bangladesh is composite and over centuries has assimilated influences of Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity. It is manifested in various forms, including music, dance and drama; art and craft; folklore and folktales; languages and literature, philosophy and religion, festivals and celebrations, as also in a distinct cuisine and culinary tradition.

The folk and tribal music and dance forms of Bangladesh are of indigenous origin and rooted to the soil of Bangladesh. Several dancing styles in vogue in the north-eastern part of the Indian subcontinent, like Monipuri and Santal dances, are also practiced in Bangladesh, but Bangladesh has developed its own distinct dancing styles, for example Nitoshilpi.

Bangladesh has a rich tradition of folk songs, with lyrics rooted into vibrant tradition and spirituality, mysticism and devotion. Such folk songs also revolve round several other themes, including love themes.

 

Natural Background

For many thousands of years a long list of regional empires and European traders fought for control of the water-logged land now called Bangladesh.

Ruled by Britain in the 19th and 20th centuries, Bangladesh (formerly called East Pakistan), was formed in 1971 when it officially separated from its union with West Pakistan (now called Pakistan).

As one of the most crowded countries on the planet, much of the lush, low-lying landscape is subject to yearly flooding, and the subsequent devastation of cyclones.

Those natural hazards have adversely affected the nation’s economy and its people, as they often cause great loss of life.

Not on the front-burner of most travelers, reports from those who venture here rave about its natural beauty, the friendly welcome, the capital city of Dhaka, and the easy-going beach resort of Cox’s Bazar – home to the world’s longest beach.

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